Masters in Information and Communication Technology (MICT)

Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology (FST)

Department: Department of Information and Communication Technology

Program: Masters in Information and Communication Technology (MICT)

Course Outline

 

ANNEX-A

DETAIL COURSE CURRICULUM

 

MICT-1102: ICT Project Management

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course Objectives:

  1. To provide information on how project management and the effective use of software can help managing ICT projects.
  2. To develop a project plan using a step-wise approach.
  3. To distinguish ICT projects from other types of projects.
  4. To apply various project scheduling techniques.

 

Course Contents:         

  • Introduction to Agile and Traditional ICT Project Management
  • Start-up and business guideline concept
  • Project Management Approaches
  • Project Conception & Initiation
  • Project Definition & Planning
  • Project Launch & Execution
  • Project Performance, Control, & Monitoring
  • Project Closure

 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of the course student will be able to:

  1. Perform Project Costing, Scheduling, Resource Allocation and Risk Management.
  2. Apply various techniques to manage project staff.
  3. Evaluate different types of ICT oriented contracts.

 

References:

  1. Project Management: A Managerial Approach, 11th Edition by Jack R. MeredithScott M. ShaferSamuel J. Mantel Jr.
  2. A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), Seventh Edition by Project Management Institute.
  3. The Scrum Guide-The Definitive Guide to Scrum: The Rules of the Game, Ken Schwaber & Jeff Sutherland, 2020

 

MICT-1104: Advanced Telecommunication Network

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

The rationale behind this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the evolution of telecommunication networks from traditional Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), through the emergence of data networks, local area networks, integrated services digital network (ISDN), broadband ISDN, development of fast packet switching, to the Internet. An overview on the Role of Telecommunications in Developing Countries, Telecommunications Organizations, Telecommunication Standardizations and Services is also provided. 

 

Course contents:

Role of Telecommunications in Developing Countries,

Telecom Organizations and Standardization: Administrative Organizations: ITU, National PTTs, Private Telephone Companies; Standardization Bodies: ITU-T, ITU-R, ISO, ETSI, etc.

 

Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN): Network Topology: International, National and Local Networks, Architecture of the Analog PSTN; Switching Hierarchy; Trunk Networks; Junction Networks; Local Distribution Networks; Local Loop and 2W/4W Circuits; Architecture of the Digital PSTN; DSL; Signaling; Dialing; Tone Dialing; DTMF; Telephone Terminals Common Channel Signaling; Telephone Numbering in PSTN; Signals Carried Over the Network: Types of Information and Their Requirements; Simplex, Half-Duplex, and Full-Duplex Communications; Frequency and Bandwidth; Analog and Digital Signals and Systems; Frequency Division Multiplexing (FDM); Time Division Multiplexing (TDM); Pulse Code Modulation; Speech Coding; Power Levels of Signals; Decibel; Gain and Loss

 

Transmission Media and Systems: Transmission Media: Copper Pairs; Optical Fibers; Radio Waves; Overview on Transmission Systems; Microwave Radio Relay Lines; Satellite Communications Networks; Optical Fiber Communication Networks; Mobile Communication Systems; Wireless Local Loop Systems

1G Telecommunication Network up to recent days 6G Telecommunication Network: Signaling, data rate, modulation, channel & sub-channels concepts, frequency bands, applications and protocol standards.

Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN): Principles; standardization; User Interface, Services, Architecture; CCITT Recommendations on ISDN; Telecommunication Services Supported by ISDN; Bearer Services Tele-services ; Supplementary Services; Subscriber Access; Connection of Terminals with Conventional Interfaces to ISDN; ITU-T Signaling Systems No.7 (SS7); B-ISDN; ATM;

Internet Technology: Internet Protocol (IP); TCP/IP; VoIP; Classifications of the Internet Telephony Networks; Network Architecture; Call Set-up Procedure; Numbering Plan; Quality of Service; Development of Internet: Bangladesh as a case study.

Course outcomes:

The Role of Telecommunications in Developing Countries; Telecommunication Organizations and Standardization; The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN); Signals Carried Over the Network; Transmission Media and Systems; Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN); x-DSL; Internet Technology.

 

 

References:

  1. T. Anttalainen: Introduction to Telecommunications Network Engineering, Artech House, Boston, 1999.
  2. J. Bellamy: Digital Telephony, John Wiley & Sons, 1991, 580 pp.
  3. T. Saadawi: Fundamentals of Telecommunication Networks, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1994
  4. M.P. Clark: Networks and Telecommunications, John Wiley & Sons, 1991
  5. R. L. Freeman: Telecommunication System Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, Second Edition, 1989
  6. Pramode K. Verma: ISDN Systems: Architecture, Technology and Applications, Prentice Hall, 1990
  7. William Stallings: strong>Advances in ISDN and Broadband ISDN, IEEE Comp. Soc. Press, 1993
  8. B. G. Lee, Broadband Telecommunications Technology, Artech House, Boston, 1996
  9. P.-G. Fontolliet, Telecommunication Systems, Artech House, 1986
    ITU-T Recommendations given in CCITT Blue Books related to PSTN, ISDN, Data Networks, etc.

 

 

MICT-1103: Advanced Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course Objectives:

1. Understand a range of techniques of intelligent systems across artificial intelligence (AI) and intelligent agents (IA); both from a theoretical and a practical perspective.

2. Apply different AI/IA algorithms to solve practical problems.

3. Design and build simple intelligent systems based on AI concepts.

4. To present an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) principles and approaches.

5. Develop a basic understanding of the building blocks of AI as presented in terms of intelligent agents: Search, Knowledge representation, inference, logic, and learning.

 

Course Contents:

Introduction; Advanced search techniques in AI, knowledge based system design, advanced plan generating systems; Probabilistic Reasoning, decision networks; Making complex decisions: Sequential decision problems, partially observable Markov decision problems (POMDPs); Multiple agent theory: Cooperation among multiple agents; Learning from observations: Inductive learning, decision trees, ensemble learning; Knowledge in learning: Use of logic, explanation based learning, inductive logic programming; Statistical learning: Complete data, hidden nodes (EM method), instance based learning, neural networks and neural belief networks; Fuzzy logic and genetic algorithm.

 

Overview of artificial neural networks; Neuro-Models; Simple neural networks; Multilayer neural networks: Multilayer Perceptron’s (MLP), logistic activation function, back propagation algorithm; Neural network applications; Overview of fuzzy system; Crisp sets to fuzzy sets; Operations on fuzzy sets, fuzzy arithmetic, fuzzy relations; Applications.

what is Machine Language; Problems, data, and tools; Visualization; Linear regression; SSE; gradient descent; closed form; normal equations; features, Overfitting and complexity; training, validation, test data, Classification problems; decision boundaries; nearest neighbor methods Probability and classification, Bayes optimal decisions, Naive Bayes and Gaussian class-conditional distribution, Linear classifiers, Bayes' Rule and Naive Bayes Model, Logistic regression, online gradient descent, Neural Networks, Decision tree; Ensemble methods: Bagging, random forests, boosting, Unsupervised learning: clustering, k-means, hierarchical agglomeration, Advanced discussion on clustering and EM, Latent space methods; PCA. Text representations; naive Bayes and multinomial models; clustering and latent space models; VC-dimension, structural risk minimization; margin methods and support vector machines (SVM), Support vector machines and large-margin classifiers

Course Outcomes:

Students should be able to:

1. Identify problems that are amenable to solution by AI methods, and which AI methods may   be suited to solving a given problem.

2. Implement basic AI algorithms (e.g., standard search or constraint propagation algorithms).

3. By attending the course the students should acquire a firm grasp of various search techniques and should be able to select an appropriate search technique and apply it in practice. Since search is such a fundamental technique in computer science, the material taught in the course is relevant in contexts other than artificial intelligence.

References:

1. “Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach”, S.J. Russell and P. Norvig.

2. “Intelligent Systems A Modern Approach”, Crina Grosan, Ajith Abraham

3. “Intelligent Systems for Engineers and Scientists”, Adrian A. Hopgood

4. “Introduction to Artificial Intelligence”, Wolfgang Ertel

5. “Introducing Artificial Intelligence”, Henry Brighton and Howard Selina

 

MICT-1201: Cloud computing

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course Objectives:

  1. To understand Cloud and Fog Computing, its evolution and applicability; benefits, as well as current and future challenges;
  2. To study the basic ideas and principles in data center design; cloud management techniques and cloud
  3. Software deployment considerations;
  4. To study different CPU, memory and I/O virtualization techniques that serve in offering software, computationand storage services on the cloud; Software Defined Networks (SDN) and Software Defined Storage(SDS);
  5. To learn cloud storage technologies and relevant distributed file systems, NoSQL databases and object storage;
  6. To distinguish the variety of programming models and develop working experience in several of them.

Course Contents:

Cloud Basics: What is Cloud Computing, Basic Concepts and Terminologies, Cloud Computing History. Cloud Characteristics, Cloud Delivery Models, Cloud Deployment Models, Goals and Benefits, Risks and Challenges.

 

Fog Computing: Fog Computing Definition, Characteristics, Application Scenarios, Issues, Fog Computing and Internet of Things, Pros and Cons, Myths of Fog Computing, Need and Reasons for Fog Computing, Fog Computing and Edge Computing, Architecture Modeling and Simulation –Challenges.

 

Cloud Enabling Technology: Internet and Networks, Data Centers, Virtualization, Web Technology. Cloud Infrastructure I: Virtual Server, Resource Virtualization, Resource Pooling and Sharing, Cloud Storage, File System, Database Technology.

Cloud Mechanism: Load Balancing, Scalability& Elasticity, Replication, Monitoring, Software Defined Networks, Network Function Virtualization, MapReduce, Identity &Access Management, Service Level Agreement: Hypervisor Clustering, Service Relocation, Dynamic Failure Detection and Recovery Architecture

Cloud Services: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, Application Services, Content Delivery Services, Analytics Services, Deployment & Management Services

Cloud Security: Basics: Security Threats and Issues, Encryption, Hashing, Digital Signature, PKI, IAM, SSO, Privacy, Security Design Principle.

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the core concepts of the cloud computing paradigm: how and why this paradigm shift came about, the characteristics, advantages and challenges brought about by the various models and services in cloud computing.
  2. Apply fundamental concepts in cloud infrastructures to understand the tradeoffs in power, efficiency and cost, and then study how to leverage and manage single and multiple datacenters to build and deploy cloud applications that are resilient, elastic and cost-efficient.
  3. Discuss system, network and storage virtualization and outline their role in enabling the cloud computing system model.
  4. Illustrate the fundamental concepts of cloud storage, cloud management and cloud services
  5. Analyze various cloud programming models and apply them to solve problems on the cloud.

References:

1. “Cloud Computing”, John W. Rittinghouse, James F. Ransome

2. “Cloud Computing”, Ray Rafels

 

MICT-1202: Internet of Things (IoT)

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. To understand of various physical phenomenon of different types of sensors and microsystems.  
  2. To design of sensors with appropriate electronic interface as a complete system.
  3. To discuss about various types of sensors like magnetic, optical, bio, chemical, radiation, electrical and mechanical etc.
  4. To emphasis on the integration of electronics with sensors to provide a smart transducer or a system on a chip with multiple integrated devices.

 

Course contents:

 

Internet in General and Internet of Things: Layers, Protocols, Packets, Services, Performance Parameters of a Packet Network as well as Applications such as Web, Peer-to-peer, Sensor networks, and Multimedia. IoT Definitions: Overview, Applications, Potential and Challenges, and Architecture. IoT Protocols: HTTP, CoAP, MQTT, AMQP, 6LoWPAN. IoT Data and the IoT Cloud Infrastructure. Performance and Security in IoT. IoT examples: Case Studies, e.g., Sensor Body-Area-Network and Control of a Smart Home.

Basic sensor technology, Sensor systems; Smart sensors basics; Smart sensors: Characteristics; Smart sensors architectures; Smart sensors buses and interfaces; Smart sensors software; Data acquisition methods for smart sensors; Virtual sensor systems; Smart sensors for electrical and non-electrical variables; Sensor networks architectures: Single node architecture; Multi node architectures; Design principles; Energy efficient topologies; Wired sensor networks and wireless sensor networks; Applications; Communication protocols: Physical layer; MAC protocols; Link layer protocols; Localization and positioning; Routing protocols; Transport layer; Data gathering and processing: Protocols for gather information; Data processing techniques; Energy management: Energy consumption of sensor nodes; energy harvesting;  Techniques for reducing consumption and communication energy; Energy aware routing; Security, reliability and fault-tolerance: Security and privacy protection; Reliability support; Fault-tolerance; Sensor networks standards; platforms and tools: IEEE 802.15.4 and IEEE 802.11; Berkeley motes; Operating systems.

 

Course outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Select the right sensor for a given application.

2. Design basic circuit building blocks.

3. Simulate, synthesize, and layout a complete sensor or sensor system, MEMS device or microsystem ready for fabrication tools.

 

References:

1. N. V. Kirianaki, S. Y. Yurish, N. O. Shpak V. P. Deynega: Data Acquisition and Signal Processing for   Smart Sensors, John Wiley, 2004

2. H. Karl, A. Willig: Protocols and Architectures for Wireless Sensor Networks, John Wiley, 2005

3. M. Ilyas, I. Mahgoub (ed.): Handbook of Sensor Networks: Compact Wireless and Wired Sensing Systems, CRC, 2004

 

MICT-1203: Advanced Database Management Systems

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course Objectives:

1. Understand the role of a database management system in an organization.

2. Understand advance database concepts, including the structure and operation of the relational data model.

3. Construct simple and moderately advanced database queries using Structured Query Language (SQL).

4. Understand and successfully apply logical database design  principles, including E-R diagrams and database normalization.

5. Design and implement a small database project using Microsoft Access.

6. Understand the advanced concept of a database transaction and related database facilities, including concurrency control, journaling, backup and recovery and data object locking and protocols.

7. Describe and discuss selected advanced database topics, such as distributed database systems and the data warehouse. 

8. Understand the role of the database administrator.

 

Course Contents:

Object Oriented Database; Data Model, Design, Languages; Object Relational Database: Complex data types, Querying with complex data types, Design;

Distributed Database: Introduction, DDBMS architectures, Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Databases, Distributed data storage, Distributed transactions, Commit protocols, Concurrency control & recovery in distributed databases, Directory systems; Parallel Database: Different types of parallelism, Design of parallel database; Spatial data management; Multimedia Database Systems Basic concepts, Design, Optimization of access strategies, Management of Multimedia Database Systems, Reliability; Database Wire-housing/Data mining: Basic Concepts and algorithms.

Advanced SQL; Some applications using SQL. Integrity constraint; Relational database design; File organization and retrieval, file indexing and hashing; Transaction manager; Concurrency controller; Recovery manager; Security system; Database administration;

 Introduction to advanced database management systems: Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT), data mining and warehousing, multimedia, object-oriented, object-relational, real-time database. Semi structured data, Information Retrieval & XML data, Introduction to information retrieval, Indexing for Text search, Web search engines, Managing text in DBMS, Data model for XML 6.6 XML DTD's, Domain specific DTD's, Querying XML data.

 

 

 

Course Outcomes:

1. Differentiate database systems from file systems by enumerating the features provided by database systems and describe each in both function and benefit.

2. Define the terminology, features, classifications, and characteristics embodied in database systems.

3. Analyze an information storage problem and derive an information model expressed in the form of an entity relation diagram and other optional analysis forms, such as a data dictionary.

4. Demonstrate an understanding of the relational data model.

5. Transform an information model into a relational database schema and to use a data definition language and/or utilities to implement the schema using an advance DBMS.

6. Formulate, using relational algebra, solutions to a broad range of query problems.

7. Formulate, using SQL, solutions to a broad range of query and data update problems.

8. Demonstrate an understanding of normalization theory and apply such knowledge to the normalization of a database.

9. Use an SQL interface of a multi-user relational DBMS package to create, secure, populate, maintain, and query a database.

10. Use a desktop database package to create, populate, maintain, and query a database.

11. Demonstrate a rudimentary understanding of programmatic interfaces to a database and be able to use the basic functions of one such interface.

 

References:

1. "Database System Concepts", Silberschatz A., Korth H.F. &Sudarshan S., Tata McGraw Hill

2. “Database Management Systems”, Ramakrishnan R. & Gehrke J., McGraw Hill

3. “Database Systems”, Thomas Connolly, Carolyn Begg, Addison Wesley

4. “Fundamentals of Database Systems”, Elmasri & Navathe, Addison Wesley

 

MICT-1204: Research Methodology

Credit Hour: 2

 

Course Objectives:

This course provides a forum for students to discuss and generate ideas on issues related to a variety of applied social research. Students conduct an in-depth study of a research topic of their choice, discuss issues with experts in the field of research, work in discussion groups, debate and problem solve on selected issues. In the research seminar, the students are given an opportunity to integrate their knowledge, skills and practical experience gained in the program.

 

Course Contents:

Current trends, practices and professional standards of applied research in different fields, i.e:
historical research, policy research, evaluation research, marketing research, advertising research, and media research. Learning Strategies and Resources: Through group discussions, readings, lectures, and independent investigation, students will be introduced to formal methods of inquiry. Students will apply this learning to develop a research question, undertake a comprehensive search for information, critically evaluate the previous work of others, and propose an original plan (i.e., grant proposal) for researching the question. Along with learning about research design and analysis, students will also be introduced to the chief research issues in a variety of disciplines and explore how innovation is fundamental to research.

 

Course Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to: 

1. Co-ordinate and participate in a seminar(s) on current research issues

2. Successfully implement an in-depth research seminar utilizing field experts and collegial discussions/input.

3. Articulate in writing a formal description of research design and research analysis.

4. Identify and assess data sources and data collection methods for quantitative studies.

5. Assess the reliability and validity of measures.

6. Demonstrate understanding of quantitative data analysis techniques.

7. Interpret analytical results from quantitative studies.

 

References:

1. Writing Successful Science Proposals by Andrew J. Friedland, Carol L. Folt, Publisher: Yale University Press; 2 edition (June 9, 2009)

2. The Myths of Innovation (Hardcover) by Scott Berkun, Publisher: O'Reilly Media (August 30, 2010)

3. Pedhazur, E. J. and Schmelkin, L. P. Measurement, Design and Analysis: An Integrated Appoach, Psychology Press, 2013

 

 

MICT-1205: Broadband and Wireless Communications

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. To distinguish the major wireless communication standards.
  2. To characterize the tradeoffs among frequency reuse, signal-to-interference ratio, capacity, and spectral efficiency
  3. To analyze the error probabilities for common modulation schemes
  4. To characterize TDMA, FDMA and CDMA

 

Course contents:

Overview of broadband wireless communications, multiple access techniques - TDMA, FDMA, Spread spectrum communications - direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS), FHSS, THSS, modulator and demodulator structure, probability of error, jamming margin, decoding, performance in the presence of interference, PN sequence, CDMA, MC-CDMA, UWB transmission. Multi-user detection: multiple access interference, detector performance measure - BER, asymptotic efficiency, near-far resistance; detectors - matched filter detector, de-correlator detector, MMSE detector, SIC, PIC, MAP and MLSE detectors. Propagation in mobile radio channels; channel models, fading - large scale and small scale fading, flat fading and frequency selective fading channel, fast fading and slow fading channel; delay spread, Doppler spread and angle spread; channel autocorrelation functions, scattering function, correlated and uncorrelated scattering (US), WSS and WSSUS model. Multiple antenna systems, capacity of SISO, SIMO, MISO and MIMO systems, ergodic capacity, outage capacity, STBC, OSTBC, QOSTBC, spatial multiplexing (SM) scheme, SM detection techniques, diversity and diversity combining techniques. Multi-carrier communications; Orthogonal FDM (OFDM), OFDM transceivers, Special issues of OFDM - cyclic prefix, timing offset, frequency offset, synchronization, peak power problem, Broadband wireless standards.

WiMAX Genesis and framework: 802.16 standard, WiMAX forum, Other 802.16 standards, Protocol layer topologies - Layers of WiMAX, CS, MAC CPS, Security layer, Physical layer, Reference model, topology.

Frequency utilization and system profiles: Cellular concept, Licensed and unlicensed frequencies, Fixed WiMAX system profiles, Mobile WiMAX profiles.

WiMAX physical layer: OFDM Transmissions, SOFDMA, subcarrier permutation, 802.16 transmission chains, Channel coding, Turbo coding, Burst profile.

WiMAX MAC and QoS: CS layer, MAC function and frames, Multiple access and burst profile, Uplink bandwidth allocation and request mechanisms, Network entry and QoS management.

Radio engineering considerations: Radio resource management, Advance antenna technology in WiMAX, MBS. WiMAX architecture, Mobility handover and power save modes, Security.

 

Course outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Learn about various multiple access techniques.

2. Calculate bit error rate & channel capacity. 

3. Know about broadband wireless standards.

 

References:

1. Wireless Communications and Networks,William Stallings

2. IEEE 802 Wireless Systems, B. H. Walke, S. Mangold and L. Berlemann, Wiley

 

MICT-1206: Advanced Operating System

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course Objectives:

  1. To understand the basic issues in operating system design and implementation.
  2. To understand the process, memory management, deadlock and file system,
  3. To study the network model, topology and protocols
  4. To understand the transport layer functionalities.

Course Contents:

 

Introduction: What is operating system?, History of operating system, Operating system concepts, Operating system structure, Processes and Threads Processes, Threads Inter process, communication (IPC), Scheduling, Classical IPC problems, Memory Management, No memory abstraction, Virtual memory, Page replacement algorithms, Design issues for paging systems, Implementation issues, File Systems, Files Directories, File system management Input / Output, Principles of I/O hardware ,Principles of I/O, software I/O, software layers, Disks, Clocks, Thin clients, Deadlocks, Resources, Detection, Recovery, Avoidance, Prevention, Virtualization and Cloud, Communication in distributed systems, Threads and thread usage, Multithreading operating system, Remote procedure call, Implementation of remote procedure call, Synchronization in distributed systems, Clock synchronization, Mutual exclusion, Transaction and concurrent control, Deadlock in distributed systems, Processor Allocation.

 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Describe, contrast and compare differing structures for operating systems.

2. Understand and analysis theory and implementation of: processes, resource control (concurrency etc.), physical and virtual memory, scheduling, I/O and files.

3. Analyze the structure of OS and basic architectural components involved in OS design.

4. Analyze the various device and resource management techniques for timesharing and distributed systems.

5. Understand the Mutual exclusion, Deadlock detection and agreement protocols of Distributed operating system

6. Students will be able to implement tools and protocols for nrtworking.

 

References:

1. “Operating System Concepts”, 7th edition, Silberschatz, Galvin, Gagne

2. “Modern Operating Systems”, 4th edition, Tanenbum, Bos

 

 

 

MICT-2101: Big Data Analytics

Credit Hour: 3 hours

 

Course Objectives:

1. Understand the Big Data Platform and its Use cases

2. Provide an overview of Apache Hadoop

3. Provide HDFS Concepts and Interfacing with HDFS

4. Understand Map Reduce Jobs

5. Apply analytics on Structured, Unstructured Data.

6. Exposure to Data Analytics with R.

 

 

Corse Contents:

Dealing with unstructured data ,Data quality management,Introduction to Big Data Analytics ,Big Data Platforms, Big Data Storage and Processing, Big Data Analytics Algorithms , Apache Spark  and Data Analytics, Linked Big Data ,Big Data Applications (TBA), Data visualization tools (e.g. Tableau), Big data analytics Cloud service (e.g AWS, Azure, Google, Oracle), Data models ,Management issues, Hadoop and Weka, Change management ,Knowledge representation , Finding business value ,Ethical issues in Big Data ,Data bases and Big Data

 

 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of big data analytics.

2. Demonstrate the ability to think critically in making decisions based on data and deep

analytics.

3. Students will demonstrate the ability to use technical skills in predicative and prescriptive  

modeling to support business decision-making.

4. Students will demonstrate the ability to translate data into clear, actionable insights.

5. Students will demonstrate effective communication skills that facilitate the effective  

presentation of analysis results.

 

References:

1. “Analytics in a Big Data World”,BartBaesens; Wiley

2. “Data Analytics”, Dr. Anil Maheshwari.

3. “Learn Analytics”, Alistair Croll& Benjamin Yoskovitz; Eric Ries Series Editor.

 

MICT-2102: Advanced Digital Signal Processing

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. To develop the knowledge on Adaptive filtering.
  2. To introduce LMS and RLS algorithm those are fundamental to all DSP techniques.
  3. To find out parametric techniques for power spectrum estimation.
  4. To study various filter banks.

 

Course contents:

Adaptive filtering: Review of the LMS and RLS algorithms, adaptive lattice-ladder filters, frequency-domain adaptive filtering methods, variable step-size adaptive filters, application of adaptive filtering, Power spectrum estimation: Review of parametric techniques for power spectrum estimation, high resolution methods, Multirate signal processing: filter banks: cosine modulated filter banks, para unitary QMF banks, multidimensional filter banks, emerging applications of multirate signal processing.

 

Course outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Design frequency domain adaptive filter.
  2. Learn about power spectrum estimation.
  3. know about applications of multirate signal processing.

 

References:

1. “Mathematical Methods and Algorithms for Signal Processing”, Moon and Stirling

2. “Theory and Application”, Kay, S. M., Modern Spectral Estimation, Prentice-Hall 2005 .

3. “Foundations of Signal Processing”, Cambridge, M. Vetterli, J. Kovacevic, and V. K. Goyal, 2014.

 

 

MICT-2105: Advanced Digital Communication

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. The objective of the course is to introduce the students to advanced topics in digital communications.
  2. The course aims to provide the students an understanding of the fundamental concepts and techniques, used in the design, performance analysis, and implementation of current communication systems and useful in the development of the communication systems of the future.

 

Course contents:

Introduction: Digital communication system (description of different modules of the block diagram), Complex baseband representation of signals, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization procedure, M-ary orthogonal signals, bi-orthogonal signals, simplex signal waveforms

Modulation: Pulse modulation and Digital transmission.

Receiver in additive white Gaussian noise channels:

Coherent and noncoherent demodulation: Matched filter, Correlator demodulator, square-law, and envelope detection; Detector: Optimum rule for ML and MAP detection Performance: Bit-error-rate, symbol error rate for coherent and noncoherent schemes.

Band-limited channels: Pulse shape design for channels with ISI: Nyquist pulse, Partial response signaling (duobinary and modified duobinary pulses), demodulation; Channel with distortion: Design of transmitting and receiving filters for a known channel and for time varying channel (equalization); Performance: Symbol by symbol detection and BER, symbol and sequence detection, Viterbi algorithm.

Synchronization: Different synchronization techniques (Early-Late Gate, MMSE, ML and spectral line methods). Communication over fading channels

 

Course outcomes:

1. The students will understand fundamentals as well as advanced concepts in digital communications.

2. They will be able to quantify the bit rate that is theoretically needed to perform source coding of continuous-valued signals with some given maximum distortion.

3. They will be able to explain the complexity-quality tradeoffs in practical systems and they will be able to quantify how close practical quantization and channel-coding algorithms can get to the theoretical limits given by information theory.

4. They will be able to design scalar and vector quantizes and linear predictive coding schemes for practical signals and they will be able to understand and apply modern channel coding concepts and digital modulation schemes in a given practical problem setting.

 

References:

1. T. Cover and J. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory, 2/e, Wiley, 2006

2. R. G. Gallager, Principles of Digital Communication, Cambridge Univ. Press, 2008.

3. A. Lapidoth, A Foundation in Digital Communication, Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009.

4. S. Lin and D. Costello, Error Control Coding, 2/e, Prentice Hall, 2004.

5. J. G. Proakis and M. Salehi, Digital Communications, 5/e, McGraw-Hill, Prentice Hall, 2007. 6. B. Sklar, Digital Communications: Fundamentals and Applications, 2/e, Prentice Hall, 2001.

MICT-2106: Advanced Computer Network

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course Objectives:

1. To provide an overview of advanced communication network functions and a good foundation for further studies in the subject. It involves understanding and application of design principles and methods for systems development and review of the underlying systems, and communications technologies and significant standardized systems.

2. To provide instruction in  advanced data communication and computer networks through lectures, tutorials.

 

Course Contents:

Design and implementation of computer communication networks and their end-to-end protocols. layered network architectures, applications, transport and routing, routing protocols, IP version 6, mobile IP, multicasting, session initiation protocol, quality of service, network security, network management, and TCP/IP in wireless networks. Data center architectures; Data center network protocols, End host architectures; Server and network virtualization, Software defined networking, Wireless sensor networks; IoT networks

 

Course Outcomes:
Students will be able to:

  1. Operation of wireless networks
  2. Emerging topics in computer networks
  3. A range of network architectures and protocols.

 

References:

  1. Data Communication & Networking – BehrouzaForouzan- McGraw Hill Education
  2. Computer Network –Tannenbaum – Pearson Education
  3. Computer Networks: Protocols, Standards, and Interfaces - Uyless Black – PHI
  4. Computer Networks a System Approach – Larry L. Peterson and Bruce S. Davie – MK Education
  5. Internetworking with TCP/IP: Principles, Protocols, Architecture - D. E. Comer - PHI

 

 

MICT-2108: Advanced Data Communications

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course Objectives:

1. To provide an overview of communication network functions and a good foundation for further studies in the subject. It involves understanding and application of design principles and methods for systems development and review of the underlying systems, and communications technologies and significant standardized systems.

2. To provide instruction in data communication and computer networks through lectures, tutorials.

 

Course Contents:

Concept of Protocols, Layered Protocol Architectures, OSI Model and TCP/IP protocol suite, Data transmission, Data encoding, Digital data communication techniques, Data link control, HDLC, Multiplexing, Transmission media, ISDN and broadband ISDN, PPP, Troubleshooting, Circuit switching, Packet switching, Frame Relay, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), Congestion control and quality of service. Frame relay architecture, Standards and protocols, Switched Multi-Megabit Data Services, ATM standards protocols, ATM LANs, Optical Communication and SONET/SDH, Broadband access technologies, x-DSL. B-ISDN protocol and architecture, Broadband service aspects and access architecture, Broadband transmission networks, Broadband intelligent network, high-speed switching architectures, network management and control, and modeling and analysis of high-speed networks.

 

Course Outcomes:
Students will be able to:

1. Understand and be able to explain the principles of a layered protocol architecture; be able to identify and describe the system functions in the correct protocol layer and further describe how the layers interact.

2. Understand, explain and calculate digital transmission over different types of communication media.

3. Understand, explain and solve mathematical problems for data-link and network protocols.

4. Describe the principles of access control to shared media and perform performance calculations.

5.  Understand and explain the principles and protocols for route calculations and be able to perform such calculations. 

6. Understand and explain reliable transmission and calculate the performance of TCP connections.

7. Understand and be able to describe for common services, system services, such as name and address lookups, and communications applications.

 

References:

  1. Data Communication & Networking – Behrouza Forouzan- McGraw Hill Education
  2. Computer Network –Tannenbaum – Pearson Education
  3. Computer Networks: Protocols, Standards, and Interfaces - Uyless Black – PHI
  4. Computer Networks a System Approach – Larry L. Peterson and Bruce S. Davie – MK Education

5.  Internetworking with TCP/IP: Principles, Protocols, Architecture - D. E. Comer - PHI

 

MICT-2107: Cellular Mobile Communication

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. To understand the basic cellular system concepts.
  2. To have an insight into the various propagation models and the speech coders used in mobile communication.
  3. To understand the multiple access techniques and interference education techniques in mobile communication.

 

Course contents:

Introduction to Cellular Mobile Radio Background and History: Conventional Mobile Radio Versus Cellular Mobile Radio; Features of Cellular Radio; Digital Cellular Radio; Trends in the Use of Cellular Services 

Mobile Radio Environment: Lowpass Equivalent Representation: Bandpass Signals and Linear Bandpass Systems; Multipath Propagation: Path Loss,Doppler Effect, Rayleigh Fading and Rician Fading; Statistics of Slow and Fast Fading; Classification of Channels: Time Dispersion and Frequency-Selective; Fading, Frequency Dispersion and Time-Selective Fading; Mathematical Modeling of Fading Multipath Channels

Diversity Schemes and Combining Techniques: Diversity Schemes: Space, Frequency, Polarization, Field Component, Angle, Time and Multipath Diversity; Combining Techniques: Selective, Switched, Maximal-Ratio, Equal-Gain and Baseband Combining

Capacity Analysis of Multiple Access Methods: Spectral Efficiency of FDMA, TDMA and CDMA Systems, The Qualcomm CDMA , Capacity Equation; Bit Rate Capacity of FDMA,TDMA and CDMA Systems in Single-Cell and Multicell Environment 

Cellular System: GSM, CDMA Cellular System, 3G CDMA System, 4G mobile system, 5G Wireless System.

Next Generation Mobile Communication

Course outcomes:

  1. Discuss cellular radio concepts.
  2. Identify various propagation effects.
  3. To have knowledge of the mobile system specifications.
  4. Classify multiple access techniques in mobile communication.
  5. Outline cellular mobile communication standards.
  6. Analyze various methodologies to improve the cellular capacity

 

Text Books:

  1. C. Y. Lee and William, “Mobile Cellular Telecommunications”, 2nd Ed, McGraw Hill. 2001
  2. Mischa Schwartz, “Mobile Wireless Communications”, Cambridge Univ. Press, UK, 2005.

 

References:

  1. Mobile Communication Hand Book”, 2nd Edition, IEEE Press. 2002
  2. Theodore S Rappaport, “Wireless Communication Principles and Practice”, 2nd Ed, Pearson Education. 2002
  3. Lawrence Harte, “3G Wireless Demystified”, McGraw Hill Publications. 2000
  4. KavehPahlavan and Prashant Krishnamurthy, “Principles of Wireless Networks”, PHI.2000

 

MICT 2109 Advancement in Microprocessor Systems

Credit Hour: 3

Course Objectives:

The course will teach students the following skills:

  • To use technical knowledge on microprocessor architecture, I/O interface and peripherals, assembly/C language programming and debugging methodology. Use design tools and related resources, microprocessor peripherals, assemblers, compilers, and monitor programs.
  • To learn microprocessor programming and architectures of advance processors.
  • To learn the architectural features of the 80286/386/486 processors.

Course content:

Introduction: Need of advance microprocessors, Difference between RISC and CISC, RISC Design philosophy, ARM Design Philosophy, History of ARM microprocessor, ARM processor family, Development of ARM architecture. The ARM Architecture and Programmers Model : The Acorn RISC Machine, ARM Core data flow model, Architectural inheritance, The ARM7TDMI programmer’s model: General purpose registers, CPSR, SPSR, ARM memory map, data format, load and store architecture, Core extensions, Architecture revisions, ARM development tools. ARM Instruction set: Data processing instructions, Arithmetic and logical instructions, Rotate and barrel shifter, Branch instructions, Load and store instructions, Software interrupt instructions, Program status register instructions, Conditional execution, Multiple register load and store instructions, Stack instructions, Thumb instruction set, advantage of thumb instructions, Assembler rules and directives, Assembly language programs for shifting of data, factorial calculation, swapping register contents, moving values between integer and floating point registers. Programming for ARM: Overview of C compiler and optimization, Basic C data types, C Looping structures, Register allocations, function calls pointer aliasing, structure arrangement, bitfields, unaligned data and Endianness, Division, floating point, Inline functions and inline assembly, Portability issues. C programs for General purpose I/O, general purpose timer, PWM Modulator, UART, I2C Interface, SPI Interface, ADC, DAC. Memory management units: Moving from memory protection unit (MPU) to memory management unit (MMU), Working of virtual memory, Multitasking, Memory organization in virtual memory system, Page tables, Translation look aside buffer, Caches and write buffer, Fast context switch extension. Advanced Topics: Advanced Microprocessor Bus Architecture (AMBA) Bus System, User peripherals, Exception handling in ARM, ARM optimization techniques.

 

Course outcomes:

After completion of the course students are expected to be able to:

  • Explain the hardware architecture of 8088/86 microprocessors and treat these Microprocessors as a component for an electronic system rather than as the basis of a personal computer.
  • Explain how each assembly language instruction functions with the Intel family of microprocessors.
  • Develop software using 16/32 bit assembly language to program a microprocessor.

 

Reference Book:

  1. Microprocessor & Interfacing – Dauglas Hall, THM
  2. Microprocessor Architecture, Programming, and Applications With the 8085, Ramesh Gaonkar, Prentice Hall
  3. Advanced 80386 Programming Techniques: James Turley
  4. Advance Microprocessor - Deniel Tabak
  5. The Intel Microprocessors (Eight Editions): Barry B. Brey
  6. The 8086 Microprocessor, Kenneth Ayala, Cengage Learning.
  7. The 8088 and 8086 Microprocessors, Triebel & Singh, Pearson Education.
  8. Computer Architecture & Organization, Subrata Ghoshal, Pearson Publication
  9. ARM System Developer's Guide: Designing and Optimizing System Software Morgan Kauffman Publisher
  10. IBM PC Assembly Language & Programming, Peter Abel, PHI.

 

 

 

MICT-2201: Advanced Optical Communication

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. The aim of this course is to train students in methods of analysis, design, dimensioning and performance evaluation of optical fiber-based communications systems.
  2. We consider the parameters of interest for systems planning to use different photonic technologies as well as advanced optical signal processing models.
  3. Using this knowledge, we will study the design and evaluation of modern optical fiber-based communication systems.

 

Course contents:

Overview of fiber optic communication systems: Ray theory transmission in optical fiber, Electromagnetic mode theory for optical propagation, Modes in a planar guide, phase shift and Evanescent field, Goos-Haenchen Shift, Signal distortion and attenuation, Kerr nonlinearity, self-phase and cross phase modulation, dispersion flattened and dispersion compensated fibers, profile dispersion, study of Polarization mode dispersion (PMD)

Optical Sources & Detectors LEDs, semiconductor lasers, construction and their characteristics, optical confinement and carrier confinement, transmitter design, Photo detectors and their characteristics, PIN and APD photo detectors, receiver’s structures, sensitivity, Noise analysis in photo detectors

Optical Amplifiers & integrated devices Introduction, performance characteristics, Semiconductor laser amplifiers, Raman and Brillouin fiber amplifier, EDFAs, optical couplers, Mach-Zehnder interferometer, optical add/drop multiplexers, isolators, circulators, optical filters, diffraction grating, switches

Design issues Transmitter circuit, LED drive circuits, laser drive circuits, optical receiver circuit: pre-amplifier and AGC, Equalizations, Digital system design considerations: regenerative repeater, optical transmitter and optical receiver, temporal losses, Optical power budgeting, analog system planning, Pulse analog techniques

Optical Networking: Optical TDM, subscriber multiplexing (SCM), WDM Optical networking: data communication networks, network topologies, MAC protocols, Network Architecture- SONET/SDH, optical transport network, optical access network, optical premise network.

Course outcomes:

  1. Define basic terminology and concepts and take the lead in fiber optic discussions.
  2. Compare and contrast the features, functions, benefits and challenges of fiber optic communications with other wireline and wireless solutions.
  3. Match communication requirements with practical fiber optic systems.
  4. Specify optical fibers, cables, connectors, splices, and other transmission equipment.
  5. Participate in or manage all aspects of the fiber optic system life cycle from planning through design, installation, maintenance, upgrading and troubleshooting.
  6. Identify when and how to test fiber optic systems by use of power meters and OTDRs.
  7. Monitor fiber optics evolution to higher performance and greater market penetration.

 

References:

  1. Optical fiber Communications : Principles and practice by John M.Senior, 3rd Edition, 2010, Pearson education
  2. Optical Fiber Communication by Gerd Keiser, 5th Edition, 2013, Tata McGraw Hills
  3. Fiber Optic Communications Technology by Djafar K Mynbaev& Lowell L Scheiner, 3rd Edition, 2008, Pearson Education.
  4. Optical communication systems by J. Gowar, 2nd Edition, 2001, Prentice-Hall of India.
  5. Fiber-Optic Communication Systems by Govind P. Agrawal, 3rd Edition, 2007, Wiley India.

 

 

MICT-2202: Information Security

Credit Hour: 3 hours

 

Course Objectives:

1. To understand how information security can counteract attempts to attack an individual’s “infosphere,” the person’s sensitive information.

2. To understand how people are the weakest components in any security system.

3. To acknowledge the students about the fundamentals of cryptography and how cryptography serves as the central language of information security.

4. To understand the basic software tools for assessing the security posture of a computer or a network.

5. To understanding how issues of privacy affect information security.

 

Course Contents:

Introduction to Information Security; The Need for Security; Legal, Ethical, Professional Issues in Information Security; Risk Management; Planning for Security; Security Technology: Firewalls and VPNs; Security Technology: Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems and Other Security Tools; Cryptography; Physical Security; Implementing Information Security; Security and Personnel; Information Security Maintenance Process leak, session hijacking ,Network Security and Infrastructure, Web Security and Software Security, Disaster Planning and Risk Management, Change and Privilege Management, Computer Forensics and the Law.

 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the practice of IS, especially in evaluation of information security risks across diverse settings including the Internet and WWW based commerce systems, high bandwidth digital communications and funds transfer services. 

2. Explore the idea that in Information Security answers are not always known, and proposed solutions could give rise to new, equally complex problems.

3. Navigate through the language and other dimensions of the field of information security in order to expand your knowledge, skills and their application. 

4. Acknowledge the ethical considerations in all judgements and decisions in academic and professional settings. 

5. Utilise software packages (for example Maple) to explore the intricacies of cryptography, demonstrating comprehension the use of these and other tools in Information Security.

 

References:

1. “Michael E. Whitman”, Herbert J. Mattord

2. “Principles of Information Security”, Michael E. Whitman, Herbert J. Mattord

3. “Information Security - The Complete Reference Second Edition”, Mark Rhodes-Ousley

4. “The Basics of Information Security”, Jason Andress

 

 

 

MICT-2203: Information Theory and Coding

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. To understand the concept of Information Theory & different types of Coding.  
  2. To learn about data encoding system.  
  3. To understand the process of performance analysis.

 

Course contents:

Fundamentals of error control coding: Block Codes and Their Implementation; Error Control for Channels with Feedback; Convolutional coding: Viterbi and sequential decoding; Coded Modulation Schemes; Concatenated Codes and Iterative Decoding; Advanced Coding Schemes: Turbo-TCM, Space Time Coding, Hybrid Coding Schemes, Adaptive Coding, Unequal Error Protection

 

Course outcomes:

Students will be able to:

  1. To reduce transmission error.
  2. To increase the performance of various transmission method.
  3. To create different types of coding based on conventional coding.

 

References:

1. Fundamentals in Information Theory and Coding- Monica Borda- Springer.

2. Information Theory and Coding- Varun Goyal- Katson Book

3. Management Information Systems- Uma G. Gupta -Galgotia Publications Private Ltd.

 

MICT-2204: Satellite & Navigation

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. The first of the primary course objectives is to understand how mission dictates orbit. This will require the student to understand the basics of orbital mechanics, the types of satellite orbits, the location of ground stations, and the look angles from ground stations to the satellite. User footprints will also be covered.
  2. The second primary objective is to use and understanding of link budget equations to provide sufficient margin for performance. This includes examining the various types of modulation, error correcting codes, and encryption.
  3. The third primary objective is to examine concepts of satellite networking. This includes mobile satellite systems for voice and internet communication, data networks, and scientific data.
  4. The fourth primary objective is to take a practical look at the engineering impact of the various satellite components on performance. These include power, size, materials used, and attitude control.

 

Course contents:

Introduction, satellite classification, solution of the space segment, evolution of the ground segment, very large aperture terminal, large and medium size antennas, small antennas, international telecommunication satellite, non-parabolic satellite antennas, voice-data-video applications, characteristics of satellite networks, Satellite repeaters, satellite earth station, satellite link analysis, link design, Access technique for satellite communication: SCPC, MCPC, SPADE etc. Spread spectrum technique in Satellite networks, Multi-beam Satellite, Inter-Satellite link (ISL), Interference in satellite link, Satellite on-board switching techniques, optical ISL. VSAT technologies, elements of VSAT networks, regulatory issues, benefits of VSATs, applications of VSATs, VSAT network configurations, protocols and interfaces, Mobile satellite system: IRID/VM, INMARSAT, ODESSEY etc. Digital Video broadcasting (DVB), Digital Audio Broadcasting.

Bangabandhu Satellite-1: Evaluation History, Spacecraft Properties, Orbital Position, Transponders, Platform.

 

Course outcomes:

1. Able to obtain different types of satellites

2. Ability to calculate the orbital determination and launching methods

3. Ability to develop commands, monitoring power systems and developments of antennas.

4. Able to design antennas to provide Uplink and Down link Frequency.

5. Able to design Satellite for real time applications.

6. Ability to design different kinds of transmitter and receiver antennas.

7. Ability to demonstrate the impacts of GPS, Navigation, NGSO constellation design for tracking and launching.

 

References:

1. Digital Satellite Communications – Tri T. Ha; McGraw-Hill International.

2. Satellite Communication Mobile & Fixed Services - Michael J. Miler; Kluwer Academic Publisher. 3. Satellite Communications - T. Pratt, C. Bostian, J. Allnut; John Wiley & Sons Inc.

4. Mobile Communication satellites theory and application – Ton Logadon; McGraw-Hill International.

5. Digital Communication System with satellite and fiber optic applications - Herald Kolimbiris; Pearson Education Private Ltd.

6. Fundamentals of satellite Communication – Rao& Raja K.N; Prentice Hall of India.

7. Fundamentals of satellite Communication – Jagannathan; Prentice Hall of India.

8. Satellite Communications - Dr. D.C. Agarwal; Khanna Publishers

 

MICT-2205: Advanced Algorithm and Optimization

Credit Hour: 3 hours

 

Course Objectives:

1. To understand the theory of optimization methods and algorithms developed for solving various types of optimization problems

2. To develop and promote research interest in applying optimization techniques in problems of Engineering and Technology

 3. To apply the mathematical results and numerical techniques of optimization theory to concrete Engineering problems.

 

Course Contents:

Optimization Problems; The Simplex Algorithm; Duality; Computational Considerations for the Simplex Algorithm; The Primal-Dual Algorithm; The Primal-Dual Algorithms for Max-Flow and Shortest Path: Ford-Fulkerson and Dijkstra; Primal-Dual Algorithms for Min-Cost Flow; Algorithms and Complexity; Efficient Algorithms for the Max-Flow Problem; Algorithms for Matching; Weighted Matching; Spanning tree and Matroids; Integer Linear Programming; A Cutting-Plane Algorithm for Integer Linear Programs; NP-Complete Problems; More About NP-Completeness; Approximation Algorithms; Unconstrained non-linear optimization problems; Constrained nonlinear optimization problems; Multi objective optimization problems; Evolutionary optimization algorithms; Adaptive Genetic Algorithm; Bayesian statistics as optimization technique; Artificial neural network; Optimization methods for inverse problems; Solving optimization problems using MATLAB.

 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Apply optimization methods to engineering problems including developing a model.

2. Define the optimization problems.

3. Apply optimization methods,

4. Explore the solution and interpret the results.

5. Develop the ability to choose and justify optimization techniques that are appropriate for

solving realistic engineering problems.

 

References:

1. “Combinatorial Optimization: Algorithms and Complexity”, Christos H. Papadimitriou.

2. “Graphs, Algorithms, and Optimization”, Donald L. Kreher and William Lawrence Kocay.

3. “Optimization Algorithms and Applications”, Rajesh Kumar Aurora     

 

MICT-2206: Advanced Embedded Systems

Credit Hour: 3 hours

 

Course Objectives:

1. To explore the fundamentals of embedded system hardware and firmware design.

2. To discuss the issues such as embedded processor selection, hardware/firmware partitioning, glue logic, circuit design, circuit layout, circuit debugging, development tools, firmware architecture, firmware design, and firmware debugging.

3. To study the Intel 8051, a very popular microcontroller.

4. Design embedded computer system hardware

5. Design, implement, and debug multi-threaded application software that operates under real-time constraints on embedded computer systems

6. Use and describe the implementation of a real-time operating system on an embedded computer system

7. Formulate an embedded computer system design problem including multiple constraints, create a design that satisfies the constraints, implement the design in hardware and software, and measure performance against the design constraints

8. To discuss the architecture and instruction set of the microcontroller and build and debug wire wrapped microcontroller board by each student.

9. The course will culminate with a significant final project which will extend the base microcontroller board completed earlier in the course.

 

Course Contents:

Introduction to systems engineering; Embedded system design; Arduino introduction and basic circuit diagrams; Instruction sets, registers and memory access; digital I/O, LEDs and buttons; Timers, debugging timers and I/O debugging; Pulse width modulation (PWM) servos; PWM; Analog to digital converters (A2D); Analog sensors; CPU bus, communication protocols (UART, SPI, RS485); Interrupts, communication; I2C, peripherals, sensors; Embedded Operating Systems; Embedded systems application; Power management, Embedded algorithms, program optimization.

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Acquire knowledge about microcontrollers embedded processors and their applications.

2. Foster ability to understand the internal architecture and interfacing of different peripheral

devices with Microcontrollers.

3. Foster ability to write the programs for microcontroller.

4. Foster ability to understand the role of embedded systems in industry.

5. Foster ability to understand the design concept of embedded systems.

 

References:

1. “Embedded System Architecture, Programming and Design”, Raj Kamal.

2. “Debugging Embedded Microprocessor Systems”, Stuart R. Ball; Butterworth-Heinemann.

3. “Embedded Microprocessor Systems: Real World Design”, Stuart R. Ball; Butterworth-

Heinemann.

4. “Embedded Systems Design”, Steve Heath; Butterworth-Heinemann.

5. “The Art of Designing Embedded Systems”, Jack G. Ganssle; Butterworth-Heinemann. 

6. “The Art of Programming Embedded Systems”, Jack G. Ganssle; Academic Press. 

7. “The Circuit Designer's Companion”, Tim Williams; Butterworth-Heinemann. 

8. “Programming Embedded Systems in C and C++”, Michael Barr; O'Reilly & Associates.

9. “An Embedded Software Primer”, David E. Simon; Addison-Wesley.

 

MICT-2207: Ethical Hacking and Intrusion Management

Credit Hour: 3 hours

 

Course Objectives:

1. The course combines an ethical hacking methodology with the hands-on application of security tools to better help students secure their systems.

2. Students are introduced to common countermeasures that effectively reduce and/or mitigate attacks.

 

Course Contents:

Ethical Hacking: Introduction to Hacking; Linux Basics; Information Gathering Techniques; Target Enumeration and Port Scanning techniques; Vulnerability Assessment; Network Sniffing; Remote Exploitation; Client-Side Exploitation; Post exploitation; Windows Exploit Development Basics; Wireless Hacking; Web Hacking.

Intrusion Management: Attack Framework; Introduction to IDS and IPS; Principles of IDS; IDS Architecture; Understanding TCP IP for IDS; Microsoft Internet Acceleration and Security Server 2004 (ISA Server 2004); Testing and ISA Server Installation; TCP Dump; Snort.

 

Course Outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Describe the concepts of ethical hacking

2. Explain the stages of a cyber attack

3. Scan and enumerate a network and a computer system

4. Execute basic attacks against network and computer systems

5. Describe and perform various methods for evading security controls

6. Describe and perform vulnerability and penetration testing assessments and exercises

 

References:

1. “Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing Guide”, RafayBaloch.

2. Intrusion Alert: An Ethical Hacking Guide to Intrusion Detection”, AnkitFadia & Manu

Zacharia.

3. “The Basics of Hacking and Penetration Testing - Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing 

Made Easy”, Patrick Engebretson.

 

MICT-2208: Antennas and Propagation 

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

1. To acquire the knowledge of designing emission, propagation and reception of electro- magnetic wave systems of antenna.

2. To identify, formulate and solve fields and electromagnetic waves propagation problems in a multidisciplinary frame individually or as a member of a group.

3. To provide the students with a solid foundation in engineering fundamentals required to solve problems and to pursue higher studies

 

Course contents:

Definitions, antenna and antenna as an aperture: arrays of point sources : review of dipoles, loop and thin linear antennas . Helical antenna, biconical and spheroidal antennas .internal-equation methods, current distribution: Self and mutual impedances, arrays: design and synthesis, Reflector type antennas, Banbiner`s principle and complementary antennas. Application of reaction concept and vocational principles in antennas and propagation; Frequency independent antennas, Scattering and diffraction, Selected topics in microwave antennas .Antenna measurements, Application of broadcasting, microwave links, satellite communication and radio astronomy 

 

Course outcomes:

  1. Applications of EM Waves in different domains and to find the time average power density.
  2. Ability to design different types of antenna.
  3. Ability to understand propagation of wave transmitted from antenna.

 

References:

1. Antennas and Wave Propagation - U.A.Bakshi

2. Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics - Simon Ramo; John Wiley & Sons.

3. Antennas and Wave Propagation- G. S. N. Raju

 

MICT-2209: Industrial Automation and Control

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. To provide the student with basic skills useful in identifying the concepts of automated machines and equipment and describe the terms and phrases associated with industrial automation.
  2. Student can demonstrate competence in maintaining and troubleshooting technology includes identifying, understanding, and performing routine preventative maintenance and service on technology.
  3. Detecting more serious problems; generating workable solutions to correct deviations; and recognizing when to get additional help.

 

Course contents:

Architecture of Industrial Automation Systems, Measurement Systems Characteristics, Data Acquisition Systems, Introduction to Automatic Control, P-I-D Control, PID Control Tuning, Feedforward Control Ratio Control, Time Delay Systems and Inverse Response Systems, Special Control Structures, Introduction to Sequence Control, PLC , RLL, Sequence Control. Scan Cycle, Simple RLL Programs, Sequence Control. More RLL Elements, RLL Syntax, A Structured Design, Approach to Sequence Control, PLC Hardware Environment, Flow Control Valves, Hydraulic Control Systems – I, Hydraulic Control Systems – II, Industrial Hydraulic Circuit, Pneumatic Control Systems – I , Pneumatic Systems – II ,Energy Savings with Variable Speed Drives ,Introduction To CNC Machines, The Fieldbus Network – I, Higher Level Automation Systems

Course outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Understand the overall automation system used in industries.

2. Acquire knowledge of different types of controlling system.

3. Learn about Hydraulic Control System.

 

References:

1. Industrial Instrumentation, Control and Automation, S. Mukhopadhyay, S. Sen and A. K. Deb, Jaico Publishing House, 2013

2. Chemical Process Control, An Introduction to Theory and Practice, George Stephanopoulos, Prentice Hall India, 2012

3. Electric Motor Drives, Modelling, Analysis and Control, R. Krishnan, Prentice Hall India, 2002

 

MICT-2210: Optical Waveguide Theory
Credit Hour: 3

Course objectives:

1. Explain the principles of optical waveguide characteristics.

2. Analyze and design optical communication systems.

3. Locate, read, and discuss current technical literature dealing with optical fiber waveguide.

4. Network management and access networks for optical waveguide.

5. Dealing with various photonic switches.

 

Course contents:

Types of optical waveguides: optical integrated circuits and guiding structures. Basics of optical waveguide analysis: basic equations for light waves, polarization of light, reflection and refraction, wave equations. Guided and radiation modes in dielectric slab waveguides, Coupled mode theory; Analytical solution for optical waveguides: WKB method, Marcatili's method, effective index method, equivalent network method, Computer aided design of integrated optical waveguide devices, Application of photonics to microwave devices, Nonlinear optical waveguides

Course outcomes:

1.Classify the Optical sources and detectors and to discuss their principle.
2.Familiar with Design considerations of optical waveguide systems.
3. To perform characteristics of optical fiber, sources and detectors, design as well as conduct experiments in software and hardware, analyze the results to provide valid conclusions.

4. To get a understanding of physical properties of optical networks.

5. To get a understanding of optical components and optical node design.

 

References:

1.Modern optical Engineering the Design of Optical Sys. – J. Smith; SPIE Press McGraw-Hill.

2.Rajiv Ramaswamy, Kumar N. Sivaranjan and Galen H. Sasaki, " Optical Networks –A practical 3.perspective",3rdedition, Elsevier, 2010.

4.Uyless Black, “Optical Networks –Third generation transport systems”,1stedition, Pearson, 2002.

5.John M. Senior, “Optical Fiber Communications – Principles and Practice”, Pearson Education, 2009

6.Biswanath Mukherjee, “Optical Communication Networks”, McGrawHill, 1997

 

MICT-2211: Microwave Tubes and Circuits

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

  1. To design a single-section quarter wavelength matching transformer in stripline or microstrip.  
  2. To determine the resonant frequency and equivalent lumped-element circuit models for transmission line stub combinations and transmission line circuits that approximate lumped-element resonating circuits.
  3. To analyze a transmission line filter structure to determine its frequency response.
  4. To learn about Electron gun and their design.

 

Course contents:

Introduction to strip lines, Micro strip lines, parallel strip lines, coplanar strip lines, shielded strip lines , Rectangular waveguides-theory and analysis, principle of circular waveguide. Electron guns and their design; interaction of electron beams and electromagnetic fields.Details of microwave tubes, Masers, parametric amplifiers, microwave circuits. Matrix representation of microwave component design, Analysis of waveguide discontinuations and non-reciprocal microwave circuits  Klystrons: Reentrant Cavities, Velocity Modulation, Bunching Process, Output Power & Beam Loading. Multicavity Klystron Amplifiers: Output Current and Output Power Of Two – Cavity Klystron, Output Power Of four –Cavity Klystron. HELIX TWTS: Slow-Wave Structures, Amplification Process, Convection Current, Axial Electric Field, Wave Modes, Gain Consideration.

 

Course outcomes:

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Analyze the difference between the conventional tubes and the microwave tubes for the transmission of the EM waves.

2. Acquire knowledge about the measurements to be done at microwaves.

3. Acquire complete knowledge about the applications of the microwaves for Radar Communications.

4. Design and simulate waveguide components for various applications..

 

References:

1. Microwave Devices and Circuits, Samuel Y. Liao, PHI, 3rd Edition.

2. Microwave Engineering, David M.Pozar, Wiley India, 3rd Edition.

3. Microwave Principles-Herbert J.Reich, J.G.Skalnik, P.F.Ordung and H.L. Krauss, CBS Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 2004.

4. Microwave Engineering Passive Circuits-Peter A.Rizzi, PHI, 1999

 

MICT-2212: Radar Engineering

Credit Hour: 3

 

Course objectives:

1.This course covers the fundamental concepts needed to understand the design and operation of radar systems for a variety of applications.

2. Topics covered include the radar range equation, signal-to-noise ratio, radar cross section, range and velocity ambiguity, radar clutter, detection and receiver design, transmitters and antenna systems. 3. Applications surveyed include pulsed, CW, and FM radars, Doppler radars, and imaging radar.

 

Course content:

Introduction: historical background, radar terminology, radar band designations. The radar equation: point targets, radar cross section, distributed targets, propagation, coverage diagrams; Noise, clutter and detection: theory of detection, sea and land clutter models, CFAR Processing; Displays: A-scope, B-scope, PPI, modern displays; Doppler radar and MTI: Doppler effect, delay-line cancellers, blind speeds, staggered PRFs, Adaptive Doppler filtering; Pulse Doppler processing and STAP: airborne radar, high, low and medium PRF operation, Space-Time Adaptive Processing; Pulse compression: principles, the ambiguity function, the matched filter, chirp waveforms, SAW technology; Waveform design: nonlinear FM, phase codes, waveform generation and compression; FM radar: principles, radar equation, effect of phase and amplitude errors; Synthetic Aperture Radar: principles, SAR processing, autofocus, spotlight mode, airborne and spaceborne systems and applications, interferometry, ISAR; Tracking radar: conical scan, monopoles, -tracker, track-while-scan, Kalman filters; Avionics and radionavigation: Air Traffic Control, primary and secondary radar, GPS Phased array radar: phased array principles, array signal processing, multifunction radar, scheduling; Electronic Warfare: ESM, ECM, ECCM; super resolution, IFM, types of jammers, calculation of performance, adaptive arrays, LPI radar; Stealth and counter-stealth: stealth techniques for aircraft and other target types, low frequency.

Introduction to radar, functional block diagrams, radar range equation, radar frequencies, pulse repetition frequency and range ambiguity, minimum detectable signal, radar cross-section of targets, detection and tracking, clutter and jamming. Doppler effect, continuous wave and frequency modulation radars, moving target indicator and phase-Doppler radars. Radar transmitter: Magnetron oscillator, klystron amplifier and traveling wave tube amplifier. Radar antenna: Antenna parameters, radiation pattern and aperture distribution. Receivers, displays and duplexers

 

Course outcomes:

  1. Understand the essential principles of operation of radar systems
  2. Apply appropriate mathematical and computer models relevant to radar systems to calculate system performance, and assess the limitations of particular cases
  3. Understand the design of radar signals, and FM radar
  4. Understand the principles of Synthetic Aperture Radar, its use in geophysical remote sensing and surveillance applications, and the digital processing used to form SAR images
  5. Design simple radar systems and the associated signal processing, at block diagram level
  6. Analyse the performance of simple tracking radar systems
  7. Understand the principles of radionavigation systems (including secondary radar and GPS)

 

References:

  1. Introduction to RADAR systems- M. Sholnik; McGraw-Hill International
  2. Principle of Radar- Tomay; Prentice Hall of India
  3. Radar design, principles, signal processing and the environment- Fred E Nathanson, PrenticeHall of India Private Ltd

 

MICT-2103:  Recent Trends in Information & Communication Engineering

Credit Hour: 3

Course Objectives:

  1. To teach any recent course relevant to the ICY field which is not in the offered list of the syllabus.

Course Contents:

Contents will be added according to the teaching materials.

This course might address the latest 4G and 5G-related topics and beyond.

 

 

MICT-2000: Thesis

Credit Hour: 18 (M. Sc. Engg. in ICT)

 

MICT-2001: Project

Credit Hour: 6 (M. Engg. in ICT)

General Info 

  • Intake: Once in a Year
  • Application Duration: 24 September - 10 November 2023
  • Written Test and Viva Voce: 24 November 2023 (0930 hrs -1730 hrs)
  • Class Start: 19 January 2024
  • Method of Application: Online
  • Course Duration: 2 (two) years, 4 (four) semesters
  • Total Credit Hours: M. Sc. Engineering (Theory: 18 Cr. + Thesis: 18 Cr.)M. Engineering (Theory: 30 Cr. + Project: 6 Cr.)
  • Total Course Fee : M. Sc. Engineering - TK. 1,63,270.00 & M. Engineering - TK. 1,48,270.00 which may be re-fixed by the authority. 

Eligibility for Admission

 (1) A minimum GPA of 3.50 out of 5.00 or a first division or equivalent in any one of SSC and HSC or in equivalent examinations

(2) Must not have a GPA less than 2.50 out of 5.00 or a third division or equivalent in any of   SSC and HSC or in equivalent examinations

(3)  At least 50% marks or a minimum GPA of 2.50 out of 4.0 in B.Sc. in CSE, EEE, EECE, ETE, ECE, ICE, IT, CS, SWE, or equivalent in the relevant discipline. 

Admission Test Syllabus 

  •  1) Basic of Computer 25 Marks
     2)
    Basic of ICT 30 Marks
     3) English 15 Marks   
  • Total= 70 Marks

Exam Type 

  •  MCQ (1 Hour)

Weightage 

  •  1) Written(MCQ) – 50%
     2) Viva- 15%
     3) Previous Exam- 35% (B.Sc.-20% and SSC/HSC-15%)
     

Contact Information 

  •  Program Co-Coordinator, MICT , Dept. of ICT, FST, BUP, Phone- 01769021830, 01769021816 (09am-04pm), Email: mict@bup.edu.bd 

Others Information 

  •      Course Interaction Time: Friday & Saturday (09:00 am – 06.00 pm)

 

 

 Masters in Information and Communication Technology (MICT)
 Introduction
The Department of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is one of the pioneer departments of this university providing top-quality educations in Information and Communication technology at its graduate programs. ICT is the leading booming sector in present day. It is already declared as a thrust sector in Bangladesh. Keeping this in mind, the department offers ICT courses to produce Information and Communication technology specialist.
Master’s in information and Communication Technology (MICT) program is designed to produce graduates with solid foundation in Information and Communication Technology skills and knowledge that can be applied across a wide range of application. It focuses on the systems development aspects of employment in the Information and Communication Technology profession. Students gain extensive experience in developing information and communication technology to address the needs of modern organizations. 
Vision of the Program
The vision of the Masters of Information and Communication Technology (MICT) program is to create future leaders in information and communication technology by focusing on training, research, and innovation in ICT related fields.

 Mission of the Program
The mission of the MICT program is to provide quality education in ICT related fields and train the students to effectively apply this education to solve real-world problems, thereby contributing towards the benefit of our country and the humanity.

 Program Objectives

a.    To master the research methods, procedures and processes, with development of critical and self-critical assessment
b.    To develop the ability to research, select and organize information by analysis, as well as synthesize solution and evaluate it and anticipate their consequences so that they contribute to the society
c.    To teach the context of applications, activities, projects and problems that replicate real-life situations with its development giving optimized solution to it using the knowledge of Information and Communication Engineering

 Learning Outcomes
Graduates with Masters in ICT degree from BUP will be able to:
a.    Demonstrate knowledge of relevant subject matter.
b.    Exhibit leadership qualities through experimental learnings.
c.    Analyze various technologies and methods to efficiently and effectively and controls ICT projects.
d.    Understand this value of sustainable ICT practices to optimize the use of available resources.

Generic Skills
Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to: 
a.    Apply the principles and theory of computing to the requirements, design and development of systems with appropriate understanding of trade-offs.
b.    Present reasoned arguments for a given information handling problem or opportunity, including the impact of modern technologies.
c.    Critically think, evaluate and test systems to ensure the system meets the criteria for its use and future development.
d.    Define and use appropriate research methods to conduct a specific project.
e.    Learn independently, be self-aware and self-manage their time and workload.
f.    Apply critical thinking to problem solving.
g.    Analyze data in multiple forms and justify the appropriate use of technology.
h.    Work effectively with others and exhibit social responsibility.

Teaching Strategy 
Students gain knowledge and understanding through practical work that allows the exposure and exploration of underpinning theory and concepts. Guided reading and online content support students in developing their understanding of the subject area. An emphasis on formative feedback and tasks is built into all the first-year modules and may include participation in online activities, in order to practice and explore the topics covered in classes more fully.
Assessment Strategy
Students’ knowledge and understanding is assessed by a range of activities that include both formative (developed to provide feedback on learning) and summative (graded) tasks. A wide range of assessment methods are used. Tasks may involve traditional approaches such as case studies, assignments, presentations and term papers, time constrained tests and exams. (Details are given in article 16 of part one)
 

--

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • On successful completion of this course students will be able to: • explain the way protocols currently in use in the Internet work and the requirements for designing network protocols. • capture and analyze network traffic.and apply the theory of basic network performance analysis • analyze soundness or potential flaws in proposed protocols • describe the current architecture of the Internet and the entities involved with the day to day running of the Internet and the process involved with development of policy and new protocols • implement key networking algorithms in simulation

Outcomes

  • Student will be able to understands application layer protocols
  • Understand routing protocols, and can design own routing protocols
  • Understand transport layer protocols
  • Use the knowledge in IoT, CPS

References

  • Book

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • 1. To understand the basic cellular system concepts. 2. To have an insight into the various propagation models and the speech coders used in mobile communication. 3. To understand the multiple access techniques and interference education techniques in mobile communication.

Outcomes

  • 1. Discuss cellular radio concepts. 2. Identify various propagation effects. 3. To have knowledge of the mobile system specifications. 4. Classify multiple access techniques in mobile communication. 5. Outline cellular mobile communication standards. 6. Analyze various methodologies to improve the cellular capacity

References

  • 1. Mobile Communication Hand Book”, 2nd Edition, IEEE Press. 2002 2. Theodore S Rappaport, “Wireless Communication Principles and Practice”, 2nd Ed, Pearson Education. 2002 3. Lawrence Harte, “3G Wireless Demystified”, McGraw Hill Publications. 2000 4. KavehPahlavan and Prashant Krishnamurthy, “Principles of Wireless Networks”, PHI.2000

Objectives

  • 1. The aim of this course is to train students in methods of analysis, design, dimensioning and performance evaluation of optical fiber-based communications systems. 2. We consider the parameters of interest for systems planning to use different photonic technologies as well as advanced optical signal processing models. 3. Using this knowledge, we will study the design and evaluation of modern optical fiber-based communication systems.

Outcomes

  • 1. Define basic terminology and concepts and take the lead in fiber optic discussions. 2. Compare and contrast the features, functions, benefits and challenges of fiber optic communications with other wireline and wireless solutions. 3. Match communication requirements with practical fiber optic systems. 4. Specify optical fibers, cables, connectors, splices, and other transmission equipment. 5. Participate in or manage all aspects of the fiber optic system life cycle from planning through design, installation, maintenance, upgrading and troubleshooting. 6. Identify when and how to test fiber optic systems by use of power meters and OTDRs. 7. Monitor fiber optics evolution to higher performance and greater market penetration.

References

  • 1. Optical fiber Communications : Principles and practice by John M.Senior, 3rd Edition, 2010, Pearson education 2. Optical Fiber Communication by Gerd Keiser, 5th Edition, 2013, Tata McGraw Hills 3. Fiber Optic Communications Technology by Djafar K Mynbaev& Lowell L Scheiner, 3rd Edition, 2008, Pearson Education. 4. Optical communication systems by J. Gowar, 2nd Edition, 2001, Prentice-Hall of India. 5. Fiber-Optic Communication Systems by Govind P. Agrawal, 3rd Edition, 2007, Wiley India.

Objectives

  • 1. To understand Cloud Computing, its evolution and applicability; benefits, as well as current and future challenges; 2. To study the basic ideas and principles in data center design; cloud management techniques and cloud 3. Software deployment considerations; 4. To study different CPU, memory and I/O virtualization techniques that serve in offering software, computationand storage services on the cloud; Software Defined Networks (SDN) and Software Defined Storage(SDS); 5. To learn cloud storage technologies and relevant distributed file systems, NoSQL databases and object storage; 6. To distinguish the variety of programming models and develop working experience in several of them.

Outcomes

  • At the end of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the core concepts of the cloud computing paradigm: how and why this paradigm shift came about, the characteristics, advantages and challenges brought about by the various models and services in cloud computing. 2. Apply fundamental concepts in cloud infrastructures to understand the tradeoffs in power, efficiency and cost, and then study how to leverage and manage single and multiple datacenters to build and deploy cloud applications that are resilient, elastic and cost-efficient. 3. Discuss system, network and storage virtualization and outline their role in enabling the cloud computing system model. 4. Illustrate the fundamental concepts of cloud storage, cloud management and cloud services 5. Analyze various cloud programming models and apply them to solve problems on the cloud.

References

  • 1. “Cloud Computing”, John W. Rittinghouse, James F. Ransome 2. “Cloud Computing”, Ray Rafels

Objectives

  • 1. To understand the basic issues in operating system design and implementation. 2. To understand the process, memory management, deadlock and file system, 3. To study the network model, topology and protocols 4. To understand the transport layer functionalities.

Outcomes

  • At the end of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe, contrast and compare differing structures for operating systems. 2. Understand and analysis theory and implementation of: processes, resource control (concurrency etc.), physical and virtual memory, scheduling, I/O and files. 3. Analyze the structure of OS and basic architectural components involved in OS design. 4. Analyze the various device and resource management techniques for timesharing and distributed systems. 5. Understand the Mutual exclusion, Deadlock detection and agreement protocols of Distributed operating system 6. Students will be able to implement tools and protocols for nrtworking.

References

  • 1. “Operating System Concepts”, 7th edition, Silberschatz, Galvin, Gagne 2. “Modern Operating Systems”, 4th edition, Tanenbum, Bos

Objectives

  • This course provides a forum for students to discuss and generate ideas on issues related to a variety of applied social research. Students conduct an in-depth study of a research topic of their choice, discuss issues with experts in the field of research, work in discussion groups, debate and problem solve on selected issues. In the research seminar, the students are given an opportunity to integrate their knowledge, skills and practical experience gained in the program.

Outcomes

  • Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to: 1. co-ordinate and participate in a seminar(s) on current research issues 2. successfully implement an in-depth research seminar utilizing field experts and collegial discussions/input. 3. articulate in writing a formal description of research design and research analysis. 4. identify and assess data sources and data collection methods for quantitative studies. 5. assess the reliability and validity of measures. 6. demonstrate understanding of quantitative data analysis techniques. 7. interpret analytical results from quantitative studies.

References

  • 1. Writing Successful Science Proposals by Andrew J. Friedland, Carol L. Folt, Publisher: Yale University Press; 2 edition (June 9, 2009) 2. The Myths of Innovation (Hardcover) by Scott Berkun, Publisher: O'Reilly Media (August 30, 2010) 3. Pedhazur, E. J. and Schmelkin, L. P. Measurement, Design and Analysis: An Integrated Appoach, Psychology Press, 2013

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • 1.Understand the role of a database management system in an organization. 2.Understand basic database concepts, including the structure and operation of the relational data model. 3. Construct simple and moderately advanced database queries using Structured Query Language (SQL). 4. Understand and successfully apply logical database design principles, including E-R diagrams and database normalization. 5.Design and implement a small database project using Microsoft Access. 6.Understand the concept of a database transaction and related database facilities, including concurrency control, journaling, backup and recovery and data object locking and protocols. 7.Describe and discuss selected advanced database topics, such as distributed database systems and the data warehouse. 8. Understand the role of the database administrator.

Outcomes

  • 1. Differentiate database systems from file systems by enumerating the features provided by database systems and describe each in both function and benefit. 2. Define the terminology, features, classifications, and characteristics embodied in database systems. 3. Analyze an information storage problem and derive an information model expressed in the form of an entity relation diagram and other optional analysis forms, such as a data dictionary. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of the relational data model. 5. Transform an information model into a relational database schema and to use a data definition language and/or utilities to implement the schema using a DBMS. 6. Formulate, using relational algebra, solutions to a broad range of query problems. 7. Formulate, using SQL, solutions to a broad range of query and data update problems. 8. Demonstrate an understanding of normalization theory and apply such knowledge to the normalization of a database. 9. Use an SQL interface of a multi-user relational DBMS package to create, secure, populate, maintain, and query a database. 10. Use a desktop database package to create, populate, maintain, and query a database. 11. Demonstrate a rudimentary understanding of programmatic interfaces to a database and be able to use the basic functions of one such interface.

References

  • 1. "Database System Concepts", Silberschatz A., Korth H.F. &Sudarshan S., Tata McGraw Hill 2. “Database Management Systems”, Ramakrishnan R. &Gehrke J., McGraw Hill 3. “Database Systems”, Thomas Connolly, Carolyn Begg, Addison Wesley 4. “Fundamentals of Database Systems”, Elmasri&Navathe, Addison Wesley

Objectives

  • 1. Understand the Big Data Platform and its Use cases 2. Provide an overview of Apache Hadoop 3. Provide HDFS Concepts and Interfacing with HDFS 4. Understand Map Reduce Jobs 5. Apply analytics on Structured, Unstructured Data. 6. Exposure to Data Analytics with R.

Outcomes

  • At the end of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of big data analytics. 2. Demonstrate the ability to think critically in making decisions based on data and deep analytics. 3. Students will demonstrate the ability to use technical skills in predicative and prescriptive modeling to support business decision-making. 4. Students will demonstrate the ability to translate data into clear, actionable insights. 5. Students will demonstrate effective communication skills that facilitate the effective presentation of analysis results.

References

  • 1. “Analytics in a Big Data World”,BartBaesens; Wiley 2. “Data Analytics”, Dr. Anil Maheshwari. 3. “Learn Analytics”, Alistair Croll& Benjamin Yoskovitz; Eric Ries Series Editor.

Objectives

  • 1. To develop the knowledge on Adaptive filtering. 2. To introduce LMS and RLS algorithm those are fundamental to all DSP techniques. 3. To find out parametric techniques for power spectrum estimation. 4. To study various filter banks.

Outcomes

  • At the end of this course, students will be able to: 1. Design frequency domain adaptive filter. 2. Learn about power spectrum estimation. 3. know about applications of multirate signal processing.

References

  • 1. “Mathematical Methods and Algorithms for Signal Processing”, Moon and Stirling 2. “Theory and Application”, Kay, S. M., Modern Spectral Estimation, Prentice-Hall 2005 . 3. “Foundations of Signal Processing”, Cambridge, M. Vetterli, J. Kovacevic, and V. K. Goyal, 2014.

Objectives

  • 1. To understand of various physical phenomenon of different types of sensors and microsystems. 2. To design of sensors with appropriate electronic interface as a complete system. 3. To discuss about various types of sensors like magnetic, optical, bio, chemical, radiation, electrical and mechanical etc. 4. To emphasis on the integration of electronics with sensors to provide a smart transducer or a system on a chip with multiple integrated devices.

Outcomes

  • At the end of this course, students will be able to: 1. Select the right sensor for a given application. 2. Design basic circuit building blocks. 3. Simulate, synthesize, and layout a complete sensor or sensor system, MEMS device or microsystem ready for fabrication tools.

References

  • 1. N. V. Kirianaki, S. Y. Yurish, N. O. Shpak V. P. Deynega: Data Acquisition and Signal Processing for Smart Sensors, John Wiley, 2004 2. H. Karl, A. Willig: Protocols and Architectures for Wireless Sensor Networks, John Wiley, 2005 3. M. Ilyas, I. Mahgoub (ed.): Handbook of Sensor Networks: Compact Wireless and Wired Sensing Systems, CRC, 2004

Objectives

  • 1. Understand a range of techniques of intelligent systems across artificial intelligence (AI) and intelligent agents (IA); both from a theoretical and a practical perspective. 2. Apply different AI/IA algorithms to solve practical problems. 3. Design and build simple intelligent systems based on AI concepts. 4. To present an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) principles and approaches. 5. Develop a basic understanding of the building blocks ofAI as presented in terms of intelligent agents: Search, Knowledge representation, inference, logic, and learning.

Outcomes

  • Students should be able to: 1. Identify problems that are amenable to solution by AI methods, and which AI methods may be suited to solving a given problem. 2. Implement basic AI algorithms (e.g., standard search or constraint propagation algorithms). 3. By attending the course the students should acquire a firm grasp of various search techniques and should be able to select an appropriate search technique and apply it in practice. Since search is such a fundamental technique in computer science, the material taught in the course is relevant in contexts other than artificial intelligence.

References

  • 1. “Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach”, S.J. Russell and P. Norvig. 2. “Intelligent Systems A Modern Approach”, CrinaGrosan, Ajith Abraham 3. “Intelligent Systems for Engineers and Scientists”, Adrian A. Hopgood 4. “Introduction to Artificial Intelligence”, Wolfgang Ertel 5. “Introducing Artificial Intelligence”, Henry Brighton and Howard Selina

Objectives

  • 1. To understand how information security can counteract attempts to attack an individual’s “infosphere,” the person’s sensitive information. 2. To understand how people are the weakest components in any security system. 3. To acknowledge the students about the fundamentals of cryptography and how cryptography serves as the central language of information security. 4. To understand the basic software tools for assessing the security posture of a computer or a network. 5. To understanding how issues of privacy affect information security.

Outcomes

  • At the end of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the practice of IS, especially in evaluation of information security risks across diverse settings including the Internet and WWW based commerce systems, high bandwidth digital communications and funds transfer services. 2. Explore the idea that in Information Security answers are not always known, and proposed solutions could give rise to new, equally complex problems. 3. Navigate through the language and other dimensions of the field of information security in order to expand your knowledge, skills and their application. 4. Acknowledge the ethical considerations in all judgements and decisions in academic and professional settings. 5. Utilise software packages (for example Maple) to explore the intricacies of cryptography, demonstrating comprehension the use of these and other tools in Information Security.

References

  • 1. “Michael E. Whitman”, Herbert J. Mattord 2. “Principles of Information Security”, Michael E. Whitman, Herbert J. Mattord 3. “Information Security - The Complete Reference Second Edition”, Mark Rhodes-Ousley 4. “The Basics of Information Security”, Jason Andress

Objectives

  • 1. To understand the concept of Information Theory & different types of Coding. 2. To learn about data encoding system. 3. To understand the process of performance analysis.

Outcomes

  • Students will be able to: 1. To reduce transmission error. 2. To increase the performance of various transmission method. 3. To create different types of coding based on conventional coding.

References

  • 1. Fundamentals in Information Theory and Coding- Monica Borda- Springer. 2. Information Theory and Coding- VarunGoyal- Katson Book 3. Management Information Systems- Uma G. Gupta -Galgotia Publications PrivateLtd.

Objectives

  • 1. The first of the primary course objectives is to understand how mission dictates orbit.This will require the student to understand the basics of orbital mechanics, the types of satellite orbits, the location of ground stations, and the look angles from ground stations to the satellite.User footprints will also be covered. 2. The second primary objective is to use and understanding of link budget equations to provide sufficient margin for performance. This includes examining the various types of modulation, error correcting codes, and encryption. 3. The third primary objective is to examine concepts of satellite networking.This includes mobile satellite systems for voice and internet communication, data networks, and scientific data. 4. The fourth primary objective is to take a practical look at the engineering impact of the various satellite components on performance. These include power, size, materials used, and attitude control.

Outcomes

  • 1. Able to obtain different types of satellites 2. Ability to calculate the orbital determination and launching methods 3. Ability to develop commands, monitoring power systems and developments of antennas. 4. Able to design antennas to provide Uplink and Down link Frequency. 5. Able to design Satellite for real time applications. 6. Ability to design different kinds of transmitter and receiver antennas. 7. Ability to demonstrate the impacts of GPS, Navigation, NGSO constellation design for tracking and launching.

References

  • 1. Digital Satellite Communications – Tri T. Ha; McGraw-Hill International. 2. Satellite Communication Mobile & Fixed Services - Michael J. Miler; Kluwer Academic Publisher. 3. Satellite Communications - T. Pratt, C. Bostian, J. Allnut; John Wiley & Sons Inc. 4. Mobile Communication satellites theory and application – Ton Logadon; McGraw-Hill International. 5. Digital Communication System with satellite and fiber optic applications - Herald Kolimbiris; Pearson Education Private Ltd. 6. Fundamentals of satellite Communication – Rao& Raja K.N; Prentice Hall of India. 7. Fundamentals of satellite Communication – Jagannathan; Prentice Hall of India. 8. Satellite Communications - Dr. D.C. Agarwal; Khanna Publishers.

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

1st Semester

Objectives

  • 1. Understand a range of techniques of intelligent systems across artificial intelligence (AI) and intelligent agents (IA); both from a theoretical and a practical perspective. 2. Apply different AI/IA algorithms to solve practical problems. 3. Design and build simple intelligent systems based on AI concepts. 4. To present an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) principles and approaches. 5. Develop a basic understanding of the building blocks ofAI as presented in terms of intelligent agents: Search, Knowledge representation, inference, logic, and learning.

Outcomes

  • 1. Identify problems that are amenable to solution by AI methods, and which AI methods may be suited to solving a given problem. 2. Implement basic AI algorithms (e.g., standard search or constraint propagation algorithms). 3. By attending the course the students should acquire a firm grasp of various search techniques and should be able to select an appropriate search technique and apply it in practice. Since search is such a fundamental technique in computer science, the material taught in the course is relevant in contexts other than artificial intelligence.

References

  • 1. “Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach”, S.J. Russell and P. Norvig. 2. “Intelligent Systems A Modern Approach”, CrinaGrosan, Ajith Abraham 3. “Intelligent Systems for Engineers and Scientists”, Adrian A. Hopgood 4. “Introduction to Artificial Intelligence”, Wolfgang Ertel 5. “Introducing Artificial Intelligence”, Henry Brighton and Howard Selina

Objectives

  • The rationale behind this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the evolution of telecommunication networks from traditional Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), through the emergence of data networks, local area networks, integrated services digital network (ISDN), broadband ISDN, development of fast packet switching, to the Internet. An overview on the Role of Telecommunications in Developing Countries, Telecommunications Organizations, Telecommunication Standardizations and Services is also provided.

Outcomes

  • The Role of Telecommunications in Developing Countries; Telecommunication Organizations and Standardization; The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN); Signals Carried Over the Network; Transmission Media and Systems; Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN); x-DSL; Internet Technology.

References

  • 1. T. Anttalainen: Introduction to Telecommunications Network Engineering, Artech House, Boston, 1999. 2. J. Bellamy: Digital Telephony, John Wiley & Sons, 1991, 580 pp. 3. T. Saadawi: Fundamentals of Telecommunication Networks, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1994 4. M.P. Clark: Networks and Telecommunications, John Wiley & Sons, 1991 5. R. L. Freeman: Telecommunication System Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, Second Edition, 1989 6. Pramode K. Verma: ISDN Systems: Architecture, Technology and Applications, Prentice Hall, 1990 7. William Stallings: strong>Advances in ISDN and Broadband ISDN, IEEE Comp. Soc. Press, 1993 8. B. G. Lee, Broadband Telecommunications Technology, Artech House, Boston, 1996 9. P.-G. Fontolliet, Telecommunication Systems, Artech House, 1986 ITU-T Recommendations given in CCITT Blue Books related to PSTN, ISDN, Data Networks, etc.

Objectives

  • 1. To provide information on how project management and the effective use of software can help managing ICT projects. 2. To develop a project plan using a step-wise approach. 3. To distinguish ICT projects from other types of projects. 4. To apply various project scheduling techniques.

Outcomes

  • At the end of the course student will be able to: 1. Perform Project Costing, Scheduling, Resource Allocation and Risk Management. 2. Apply various techniques to manage project staff. 3. Evaluate different types of ICT oriented contracts.

References

  • 1. Project Management: A Managerial Approach, 4 th Edition, Jack Meredith and Samuel Mantel. 2. Project Management: Strategic Design and Implementation, 4th Edition, David Cleveland and Lewis Ireland. 3. Software Project Management, 4th Edition, Mike Cotterel and Bob Hughes. 4. Project Management for Information Systems by James Cadle& Donald Yeates, Prentice Hall, Fourth Edition, ISBN 0-273-68580-5.

2nd Semester

Objectives

  • 1. To understand Cloud and Fog Computing, its evolution and applicability; benefits, as well as current and future challenges; 2. To study the basic ideas and principles in data center design; cloud management techniques and cloud 3. Software deployment considerations; 4. To study different CPU, memory and I/O virtualization techniques that serve in offering software, computationand storage services on the cloud; Software Defined Networks (SDN) and Software Defined Storage(SDS); 5. To learn cloud storage technologies and relevant distributed file systems, NoSQL databases and object storage; 6. To distinguish the variety of programming models and develop working experience in several of them.

Outcomes

  • 1. Explain the core concepts of the cloud computing paradigm: how and why this paradigm shift came about, the characteristics, advantages and challenges brought about by the various models and services in cloud computing. 2. Apply fundamental concepts in cloud infrastructures to understand the tradeoffs in power, efficiency and cost, and then study how to leverage and manage single and multiple datacenters to build and deploy cloud applications that are resilient, elastic and cost-efficient. 3. Discuss system, network and storage virtualization and outline their role in enabling the cloud computing system model. 4. Illustrate the fundamental concepts of cloud storage, cloud management and cloud services 5. Analyze various cloud programming models and apply them to solve problems on the cloud.

References

  • 1. “Cloud Computing”, John W. Rittinghouse, James F. Ransome 2. “Cloud Computing”, Ray Rafels

Objectives

  • 1. To understand of various physical phenomenon of different types of sensors and microsystems. 2. To design of sensors with appropriate electronic interface as a complete system. 3. To discuss about various types of sensors like magnetic, optical, bio, chemical, radiation, electrical and mechanical etc. 4. To emphasis on the integration of electronics with sensors to provide a smart transducer or a system on a chip with multiple integrated devices.

Outcomes

  • 1. Select the right sensor for a given application. 2. Design basic circuit building blocks. 3. Simulate, synthesize, and layout a complete sensor or sensor system, MEMS device or microsystem ready for fabrication tools.

References

  • 1. N. V. Kirianaki, S. Y. Yurish, N. O. Shpak V. P. Deynega: Data Acquisition and Signal Processing for Smart Sensors, John Wiley, 2004 2. H. Karl, A. Willig: Protocols and Architectures for Wireless Sensor Networks, John Wiley, 2005 3. M. Ilyas, I. Mahgoub (ed.): Handbook of Sensor Networks: Compact Wireless and Wired Sensing Systems, CRC, 2004

Objectives

  • 1. Understand the role of a database management system in an organization. 2. Understand advance database concepts, including the structure and operation of the relational data model. 3. Construct simple and moderately advanced database queries using Structured Query Language (SQL). 4. Understand and successfully apply logical database design principles, including E-R diagrams and database normalization. 5. Design and implement a small database project using Microsoft Access. 6. Understand the advanced concept of a database transaction and related database facilities, including concurrency control, journaling, backup and recovery and data object locking and protocols. 7. Describe and discuss selected advanced database topics, such as distributed database systems and the data warehouse. 8. Understand the role of the database administrator.

Outcomes

  • 1. Differentiate database systems from file systems by enumerating the features provided by database systems and describe each in both function and benefit. 2. Define the terminology, features, classifications, and characteristics embodied in database systems. 3. Analyze an information storage problem and derive an information model expressed in the form of an entity relation diagram and other optional analysis forms, such as a data dictionary. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of the relational data model. 5. Transform an information model into a relational database schema and to use a data definition language and/or utilities to implement the schema using anadvance DBMS. 6. Formulate, using relational algebra, solutions to a broad range of query problems. 7. Formulate, using SQL, solutions to a broad range of query and data update problems. 8. Demonstrate an understanding of normalization theory and apply such knowledge to the normalization of a database. 9. Use an SQL interface of a multi-user relational DBMS package to create, secure, populate, maintain, and query a database. 10. Use a desktop database package to create, populate, maintain, and query a database. 11. Demonstrate a rudimentary understanding of programmatic interfaces to a database and be able to use the basic functions of one such interface.

References

  • 1. "Database System Concepts", Silberschatz A., Korth H.F. &Sudarshan S., Tata McGraw Hill 2. “Database Management Systems”, Ramakrishnan R. &Gehrke J., McGraw Hill 3. “Database Systems”, Thomas Connolly, Carolyn Begg, Addison Wesley 4. “Fundamentals of Database Systems”, Elmasri & Navathe, Addison Wesley

Objectives

  • This course provides a forum for students to discuss and generate ideas on issues related to a variety of applied social research. Students conduct an in-depth study of a research topic of their choice, discuss issues with experts in the field of research, work in discussion groups, debate and problem solve on selected issues. In the research seminar, the students are given an opportunity to integrate their knowledge, skills and practical experience gained in the program.

Outcomes

  • 1. Co-ordinate and participate in a seminar(s) on current research issues 2. Successfully implement an in-depth research seminar utilizing field experts and collegial discussions/input. 3. Articulate in writing a formal description of research design and research analysis. 4. Identify and assess data sources and data collection methods for quantitative studies. 5. Assess the reliability and validity of measures. 6. Demonstrate understanding of quantitative data analysis techniques. 7. Interpret analytical results from quantitative studies.

References

  • 1. Writing Successful Science Proposals by Andrew J. Friedland, Carol L. Folt, Publisher: Yale University Press; 2 edition (June 9, 2009) 2. The Myths of Innovation (Hardcover) by Scott Berkun, Publisher: O'Reilly Media (August 30, 2010) 3. Pedhazur, E. J. and Schmelkin, L. P. Measurement, Design and Analysis: An Integrated Appoach, Psychology Press, 2013

3rd Semester

Objectives

  • 1. Understand the Big Data Platform and its Use cases 2. Provide an overview of Apache Hadoop 3. Provide HDFS Concepts and Interfacing with HDFS 4. Understand Map Reduce Jobs 5. Apply analytics on Structured, Unstructured Data. 6. Exposure to Data Analytics with R.

Outcomes

  • 1. Demonstrate knowledge of big data analytics. 2. Demonstrate the ability to think critically in making decisions based on data and deep analytics. 3. Students will demonstrate the ability to use technical skills in predicative and prescriptive modeling to support business decision-making. 4. Students will demonstrate the ability to translate data into clear, actionable insights. 5. Students will demonstrate effective communication skills that facilitate the effective presentation of analysis results.

References

  • 1. “Analytics in a Big Data World”,BartBaesens; Wiley 2. “Data Analytics”, Dr. Anil Maheshwari. 3. “Learn Analytics”, Alistair Croll& Benjamin Yoskovitz; Eric Ries Series Editor.

Objectives

  • 1. To develop the knowledge on Adaptive filtering. 2. To introduce LMS and RLS algorithm those are fundamental to all DSP techniques. 3. To find out parametric techniques for power spectrum estimation. 4. To study various filter banks.

Outcomes

  • 1. Design frequency domain adaptive filter. 2. Learn about power spectrum estimation. 3. know about applications of multirate signal processing.

References

  • 1. “Mathematical Methods and Algorithms for Signal Processing”, Moon and Stirling 2. “Theory and Application”, Kay, S. M., Modern Spectral Estimation, Prentice-Hall 2005 . 3. “Foundations of Signal Processing”, Cambridge, M. Vetterli, J. Kovacevic, and V. K. Goyal, 2014.

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

4th Semester

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!